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Laundry Room ~ Progress

It’s been a busy week between ridding the house of strep throat, hosting a small family Christmas and taking newborn photos of my nephew but we’ve still managed to make some progress on the laundry room, so I wanted to give you a little peek and show you how to make an incredibly easy countertop to boot!

Somehow Rick managed to snag two days off in a row, so we shipped the kids off to daycare and dug right in. One of the biggest changes to the laundry room was the addition of countertops.

Originally I planned to create a table to slide over the washer and dryer, but my husband had other plans in mind. And that was to build a counter running from wall to wall over the washer/dryer and sink.

You see, the problem is, once I get an idea stuck in my head it can be very umm…challenging….to change my mind.

In the end Rick ended up winning his version of the countertop, and I’m so glad I let him win!

We chose 1 x 6 maple boards, which is a nice hard wood for a countertop. To create the countertops we measured the length each board needed to be, cut the boards to size, then got busy assembling.

It gave me another excuse to use my kreg jig, so I was a happy gal. If you’re not sure, you can see here what a kreg jig is.

I started by drilling pocket holes approximately every 12 inches on the underside of the countertop.

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I then carefully lined up the edges of the wood making sure the surface was as smooth as possible, and clamped together. Once everything was clamped into place, I inserted the screws and repeated until the entire countertop was made!

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Once the countertop was assembled, we used the belt sander to smooth out the top. Being this is a hard wood, we had to use 60-80 grit sandpaper to smooth out the really rough edges. Then finished it with 120 followed by 220 grit.

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You can see our garage floors are spotless.

And before we knew it, it was time to install the countertop.

Insert happy dance!

Once it was installed, we added a 1 x 3″ maple face piece to the front of the countertop. We did this because we wanted to leave space on top of the washer and dryer in the event we needed to move it in an emergency. The face piece could be quickly removed if needed, but serves to hide the big gap between the counter and washer/dryer. I’ll show how we actually installed the countertop once the room is finished!

And this is what the very rough finish looks like with the first coat of Minwax Jacobean stain. It hasn’t been sealed, there’s no backsplash or any other frills yet. And excuse the pic from my phone, but I’m saving the good stuff for the reveal!

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I just couldn’t wait to show you how easy it was to make this countertop! And you know what’s the really crazy thing? It cost $38.95!

We were able to keep the cost down because I had the stain and screws needed for assembly on hand. All we had to do was purchase the lumber.

I can’t wait to show you the finished room, until then enjoy this cutie I had the pleasure of snapping some photos of yesterday!

And I’m no professional photographer, far from, but this little guy made it easy!

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About Amanda

I’m a Minnesota mama of three, wife of one, and human to our 4 legged canine friends Charlie and Jack. I’m a lover of all things DIY, coffee with cream, summer nights at the lake and good craft beer.

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